PTSD Treatment that Works

PTSD Treatment that Works

No time for games.  Persistent posttraumatic stress disorder needs serious and effective treatment, as soon as you can get it. Lost time off work may be 

Distressed_man_sittng_on_floorthe least of it. The risks of losing relationships, your job, or your longer-term stability can be very real. If PTSD symptoms (like nerve-wracking memories or dreams, ‘zoning out,’ feeling upset at seeing reminders, or your body going into panic mode) have not resolved several weeks or months after the traumatic incident, you will most likely need therapy to recover. The good news is this: Even if you have had PTSD for many years, evidence-based therapy is usually still effective. Even more good news:  Before PTSD (right after the incident) comes Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) which is a version that has not yet gotten entrenched. When you get the right supports during ASD (and therapy can be one of them) often it will not even turn into PTSD, in the first place.  For either disorder, the highest success-rate methods are those which are first heavily researched and then thoughtfully individualized to you, so they fit your needs. First responders, veterans, victims of crime and victims of abuse are all at risk for AppleMarkdeveloping PTSD or ASD. Choose a practitioner registered to practice clinical psychology. This assures that you are getting a big-picture assessment that first makes sure we know what we are treating (sometimes another problem was there, before, and also needs help) and then also looks to see there are other, new problems, existing alongside PTSD, or complicating PTSD. About three to four
months of weekly work is a typical course of treatment. Occasional follow-up can also be necessary. If  you are a veteran and able to get a certificate to be reimbursed for a private registered psychologist of your own choosing, this funding model will be accepted. (Unfortunately, motor vehicle accident victims are not seen at this practice. However, this practice can refer you to a highly competent psychologist for treatment of PTSD or ASD.)  
Ken McCallion, MA, CPsych Assoc